The leap second has had been a problem for Java apps (389-console for me) and apparently some ruby apps (seems like puppet ((can't prove it)) ). I found the common fix is to just set the date based on the current date as shown here.

Doing this on all the machines, a single line with func.


We are using gnarwl for vacation notification and I would like gnarwl to only reply if the current time is in the vacationStart vacationEnd window.

Here is the queryfilter to do that using the following information:

<br />
$recepient           - receiver of the message<br />
$time                - current time in seconds since the epoch


I often use dd to copy large files or make images from hard drives. It's annoying to watch something without any progress indicator, so I use the little known kill switch on dd.

From the man page:

Sending a USR1 signal to a running ‘dd’ process makes it print I/O statistics to standard error and then resume copying.

$ dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/null& pid=$!


I wanted to monitor the ambient temperature in my computer room and decided to try using the built in sensors on my servers. ipmitool showed an ambient temperature, so I did some sed to get just the temperature.


[thomas@hotstuff: ~] $ sudo ipmitool sdr type "Temperature" |grep Ambient
Ambient Temp | 08h | ok | 7.1 | 22 degrees C


A talk I gave at PICC 12 on mock

Slides available here


Update: I noticed that the syntax for vacationStart and vacationEnd do not permit integer comparisons. So I changed them from 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.40 to 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.15. This change allows you to make a gnarwl search string that uses the current time to check if a vacation is active.


This is just a case of RTFM but I thought I'd share...


While playing around with getting host entries to work with ldap, I found that my previous code for using gethostbyname was not running clean on puias6. Here is an updated version

<br />
#include <stdio.h><br />
#include <netdb.h><br />
#include <stdlib.h><br />
#include <sys/socket.h><br />
#include <netinet/in.h><br />
#include <arpa/inet.h></p>
<p>int main(int argc, char **argv) {<br />
	int i;


We store our host information in ldap. Previously using ldap for host lookups was done by adding the appropriate entries to /etc/ldap.conf and changing nsswitch.conf.

With 6, nss_ldap has been replaced by nslcd, so I needed to change our setup a little.
I put the following into nslcd.conf


uid nslcd
gid ldap
uri ldap://ldap2.example.com


Slides from LISA 2019 Linux systems troubleshooting #LISA2019 https://t.co/D4dMKflK6R Tue Oct 29 05:59:30 +0000 2019

https://t.co/AGeihMALAv configuring grub2 with EFI Fri Sep 13 05:20:01 +0000 2019

I published a Thing on @thingiverse! https://t.co/IYpRyEb7Hz #thingalert Tue Jul 23 19:27:57 +0000 2019

Nokogiri install on MacOSX https://t.co/v3An0miW9L Fri Jul 12 15:06:49 +0000 2019

HTML email with plain mailer plugin on Jenkins https://t.co/Z6FSDMDjy8 Thu Jul 11 21:07:25 +0000 2019